Monday, 27 February 2012

leadership- Dunedin

day 2 Dunedin
So far so good....have had a good intro to the types of leadership ...transactional and transformational...and then the bits that go under a combination of these...model/inspire/encourage/challenge and enable...how good at these traits was given a look at by the 360 results and from there strengths and weaknesses.Praise  recognises and acknowledges...use it - Set a goal and you are more likely to accomplish it is proven in research. Identifying personal values and goals is a good inward look at ones self ....what am i passionate about and how does that affect me at school? How much do I use contingent reward strategy....usually unwittingly as the person getting the reward is a trusted other.Relational skills are all....how to work hard on these...a key to excellent leadership. Transcending self interest is the key difference between transactional and transformational leadership. Take feedback with grace. That can be a challenge!
Cognito ergo sum....I think therefore i am. Ma te mahi ka ora ---from hard work comes success.

Thursday, 23 February 2012

Nga Manu day 1

A tuatara -silky smooth!


rumohra spp.
My first full day at Nga Manu nature reserve was full on! I followed the head keeper on his morning rounds, helping where i could and trying to take in his knowledge. Reece was a mine of information about plants, birds, reptiles and native fish species including eels. 150 children came through the reserve during the morning as a group booking and Reece gave them extensive info on the kiwi and then fed the long finned eels. We fed tuatara  and weighed and fed 10 or so kiwi. We prepared food for most of the caged birds and had a chat to the talking tui. it is an enormous procedure and our walk in the afternoon focussed  on the many ferns present in the reserve...Reece is also very knowledgeable in this area. I will have a good opportunity to collect from here and then Hemi Matenga...the ridgeline beckons. Nga Manu had filmy ferns/ asplenium/ rhumora/ blechnum/shining spleenworts/ cyathea/ dicksonia ...to name but a few common ones.
Ghekos have smooth skins/ skinks have scales.

Tuesday, 21 February 2012

curriculum days

some excellent learning handson opportunities at the Curriculum days just passed. Of course the best part is sharing collegially and finding out about others experiences and what they are doing on their PSTF. I look forward to next week with some trepidation but will be good to catch up with everyone again.
video
DNA

Civic square

wind

te papa
The jumping ooblik will be a fun expt to reenergise my kids on return and also some excellent websites gleaned along the way. I need to make more use of the science learning hub as it includes all of the context for the science and not just one off fun experiments....the danger when one is surfing the net for fun stuff to do but bears no relationship to set curricula...ah well breaking out needs to happen more often!
I found the hands on learning a great way to mix up and get to know people while also making me think about how to use these practical ideas in a classroom.
NOS is worth really exploring and the photo session in town can be easily replicated aroung the classroom or school for children...TALK about the science around us.

Monday, 20 February 2012

PSTF things to do


Ten things you can do during fellowship.......

1. Find out if there is an induction programme
2. Join in with coffee breaks, all about building relationships
3. Make a learning wall, timetable up as well as any questions you have
4. Be proactive in setting up your own records
5. Seek learning opportunities. RSNZ opens doors!
6. Make sure you join in visits with other fellows
7. Carry a camera with you
8. You may need to put in extra money yourself
9. Be adaptable, add in new things if you want
10. Take 'you' time and learn life's lessons
Thanks Mandy!



Types of investigation

The principles of fair testing are important, but may not always enable students to understand ideas or concepts, answer their questions, or understand how scientists work and the nature of science.
Scientists use different methods of investigation in different circumstances. These methods include (in no particular order) fair testing, identifying and classifying, modelling, pattern seeking, and researching.
Research has shown that science teaching is dominated by fair testing. The principles of fair testing are important, but may not always enable students to understand ideas or concepts, answer their questions, or understand how scientists work and the nature of science.
The aim of this section is to broaden your understanding of the different types of investigations you can use with your students. The activities provided on this website also provide examples of these types of investigations.

Fair testing

Fair testing finds relationships between factors (variables). A single variable is changed while keeping other variables the same. Any differences are said to be the result of the changed variable.
This method is most easily suited to technology investigations, for example, ‘Which paper towel can soak up the greatest volume of water?’, and physical sciences, for example, ‘Will the reaction go faster if a more concentrated acid is used?’ Fair testing is particularly well suited to investigations that record measurements.
This method will not work well where investigations:
  • need to be done in the field
  • are monitoring change over time
  • need to examine a whole system, not just isolated parts.

Identifying and classifying

Identifying and classifying involves sorting objects or events into groups or categories. Clear systems (criteria) must be developed and used. Keys are often used as criteria to carry out a classifying process for example, identifying and naming plants.
If the criteria are changed the groupings that result may be quite different and can lead to new scientific discoveries. For example, living things were initially divided into two kingdoms – plants and animals. When micro-organisms were discovered and studied, changes were made to the classification system and the number of kingdoms. A five kingdom classification system is now commonly accepted.

Modelling

A model can be used to help students understand how a process works, or to explain ideas or a concept. More than one model can be used to explain different aspects of the same concept for example, there are several models that help describe the structure of the atom.
Some models are already produced, for example, a model heart or diagram. Others will need to be set up, for example, using flour to model impact craters on the Moon.
Electronic models can show sequences and processes, and some can be found on the Internet, for example, Day and Night: Views from the Southern Hemisphere and Open Heart.
For information about the learning challenges of models see Teaching with models .

Pattern seeking

This method involves observing and recording natural events, or carrying out experiments where the variables can’t easily be controlled.
In pattern seeking, it is still important to note and record variables. The investigator needs to try to identify patterns that result from these variables.
This method is well suited to system sciences like geology, astronomy, ecology, or meteorology.
Once a pattern has been observed this may lead to other investigations in an effort to try to explain why a particular pattern occurs, and to a classifying and identifying system.
Pattern seeking can also help us create models to explain observations, for example, to explain the phases of the Moon.

Researching

Researching involves gathering and analysing other people’s opinions or scientific findings in order to answer a question or to provide background information to help explain observed events.
Research can also show how scientists’ ideas have changed over time as new evidence has been found.
Students need to practice each stage in the research process.
Stage 1: Focusing and planning
Questions relevant to the direction of the research are generated.
Stage 2: Sourcing information
Appropriate resources must be found. Using a range of different sources of information helps ensure the ideas are those commonly accepted.
Stage 3: Analysis
The information needs to be organised and then analysed to ensure that valid conclusions can be drawn.
Stage 4: Reporting
Finally the research must be reported. This can be done in various ways – for example a demonstration, a poster, a video or a report.
Reference: Ministry of Education. (2001). Making better sense of the living world. Wellington: Learning Media.

Sunday, 19 February 2012

Curriculum Days , Wellington



here we are at the gateway! Learning about our fellow Fellows and looking at science exploration.




























to be set up, for example, using flour to model impact craters on the Moon.


Electronic models can show sequences and processes, and some can be found on the Internet,
for example, Day and Night: Views from the Southern Hemisphere and Open Heart.

For information about the learning challenges of models see Teaching with models .

Pattern seeking

This method involves observing and recording natural events, or carrying out experiments
where the variables can’t easily be controlled.

In pattern seeking, it is still important to note and record variables. The investigator needs to
try to identify patterns that result from these variables.

This method is well suited to system sciences like geology, astronomy, ecology, or
meteorology.

Once a pattern has been observed this may lead to other investigations in an effort to try to
explain why a particular pattern occurs, and to a classifying and identifying system.

Pattern seeking can also help us create models to explain observations, for example, to
explain the phases of the Moon.

Researching

Researching involves gathering and analysing other people’s opinions or scientific findings
in order to answer a question or to provide background information to help explain observed
events.

Research can also show how scientists’ ideas have changed over time as new evidence has
been found.

Students need to practice each stage in the research process.

Stage 1: Focusing and planning
Questions relevant to the direction of the research are generated.

Stage 2: Sourcing information
Appropriate resources must be found. Using a range of different sources of information helps
ensure the ideas are those commonly accepted.

Stage 3: Analysis
The information needs to be organised and then analysed to ensure that valid conclusions can
be drawn.

Stage 4: Reporting
Finally the research must be reported. This can be done in various ways – for example a
demonstration, a poster, a video or a report.

Reference: Ministry of Education. (2001). Making better sense of the living world.
Wellington: Learning Media.

http://scienceonline.tki.org.nz/Teaching-science/Teaching-Strategies/Types-of-investigation

Friday, 17 February 2012

More practice at identifying!


Ok so here is where I am currently working for those of you who don't live in the NI or particularly
Wellington plus a few shots of the lab
 
 .
 
a filmy fern which has been collected ready for cataloguing in the Te Papa Herbarium collection


what i look down a microscope for....shape and attachment of indusium

spores and indusium

...Adiantum showing kidney shaped indusium
(maidenhair fern)

my walk along the water front








...I work in the second floor "bubble" over looking the marina

lots of ferns to try out my knowledge

Asplenium flaccidum

and that adds some for last week....we also did a field trip to Hokio Beach near Levin to look for a rare Ophioglossum fern...didn't find but we found a special liverwort and saw two pairs of breeding spoonbills...wow!!Interesting sandy wetland area.


Monday, 13 February 2012

week 2 or is it 3?

I am so enjoying the change of pace with an early commute to Wellington...an hour of book reading followed by a 20 minute walk to Te Papa...thought I would share the sights of my morning walk to work!So far NO southerly gales and gorgeous weather along the Wellington waterfront.
The identification process is long but necessary and I am slowly getting better with help from Dr Leon and Patrick. We off on a field trip on Thursday to hunt for a so far unsighted fern called anOphioglossum                or Spear fern.Will let you know how that goes.Leon has given me a "square" of NZ to collect from which is really Waikanae and Paraparaumu area   NZMS260  R 26. I have to read lattitude and longitude to say where from /id genus and species/ check the WELT collection / find out if it is there and / or    pre 1970 collected then depending on that answer....collect/press/ dry and then freeze for both Te papa and Nga Manu. Sound complex...well it could be...I also have to have all info on a spread sheet.
This process of hunting and collecting will start mid next week.

Will share photos of my walk later...I left the card out of the camera!!

Thursday, 9 February 2012

first week down

So my friend and colleague Sarah has set me up with a field microcope and I'm ready to test my key skills in the bush! well not quite ....but I am beginning to recognise the bits I need to for accurate genus and species identification. Mostly ok but still not all of them correct...early days. Hopefully on Monday I will be able to go with Leon to investigate the ferns at Te Papa Bush area. Working in the "bubble" at Te Papa with botanists is very cool! I have been talking to Leon about maybe a field trip with him at some stage but will have to wait and see. Off to the bush on our block for today.

Wednesday, 8 February 2012

7/2/12
Today spent identifying ferns !!I now know a few ways to get the "key " working for me....rachis, lamina, glabrous, pinnate, bipinnate, tripinnate, dichotomous, sporangia locaton and type, fertile and infertile fronds (blechnum) - asplenum and all sorts of other( for now)  meaningless latin names.
Was a very good computer key...needed to use microscope a lot.
first commute into town ....2 hours! A death on the tracks coming home.
Ok ...the journey has begun...alot of fern talk and a huge amount of technical talk and terminology. I am spending time on Floor 2 of Te Papa in the Botany department ...the bubble on the south side for those of you that know Te Papa.  So far I have been busy honing my skills on identification and using both a written key and an online tool developed by one of my mentors Patrick Brownsey. Have also been given the low down on how to collect, what to collect and the fern bits to take closest note of for ID purposes. Am getting used to it but a long way to go yet!Today I ploughed through 25 ferns and Id'ed them....tommorow i will check out how I did!
Commuting to Wellington takes a while and my first day meant a 2 hour delay on way home for an incident on the tracks....today all good. Enough...will report again tomorrow.

Wednesday, 1 February 2012

Profile

Wendy Hogg


Type: Primary Science
School: Kapanui Primary School www.kapanui.school.nz
Programme: Fern Hunt
Hosts: Museum of New Zealand Te Papa, Tongarewa
Nga Manu Nature Reserve, Waikanae- ngamanu@clear.net.nz
Wikispace- Corers12-1 wendy pearson

Description


Wendy Hogg is a graduate Bachelor Agricultural Science (Lincoln 1980) and post graduate diploma in Education (Victoria ). She has spent the last 10 years teaching at Kapanui School across a number of different levels but mainly year 5/6.Prior to this Wendy worked in Agricultural consultancy both in New Zealand and latterly in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.


Hosting Wendy in 2012 are 2 organisations that will provide support and learning opportunities on a number of levels. Dr Leon Perrie, Curator of Botany at Te Papa will train Wendy to identify, gps position,photograph and classify ferns. Bruce Benseman, Manager at Nga Manu Nature reserve in Waikanae will involve Wendy in the day to day activities at Nga Manu and she will help establish a fern educational resource for the centre’s new classroom. She will also be seeking to find, photograph and identify ferns that are specific to the Kapiti Coast to add to the Te Papa information resources.

Wendy is looking forward to discovery and new learning. She is particularly excited by the prospect of finding out about such primitive botanic plants and the possibility of discovering new species. Working in a local community will assist in taking new science learning back to the classroom later in the year and beyond. A world of wonder awaits!

Increasing the opportunities students have to talk about science has many benefits. It provides opportunities for teachers to learn about the knowledge students already have and makes students’ thinking visible. In this way it is an important tool for formative assessment. Talk, however, does much more than just make thinking visible: it actually supports the development of thinking. A large number of studies have shown that structured classroom talk produces deeper engagement with the content under discussion, and develops subject-specific reasoning Resnick, Michaels and O’Connor (2010) call talk that attempts to make discourse norms and ways of behaving accessible to all, Accountable Talk. This sort of talk attends to, and builds on, the ideas of others; emphasises logical connections and the drawing of reasonable conclusions; and speakers endeavour to make explicit the evidence behind their claims. To begin these sorts of discussions, students need to have interesting and complex questions and ideas to talk about.